Dr. Robert Heller’s Mind-Body Newsletter

“Healthy Living for the Mind, Body and Spirit”

March, 2013

Quote of the Month

“Life is not the way it’s supposed to be. It’s the way it is. The way you cope with it is what makes the difference.” –Virginia Satir

Reflect on the meaning of this quote. What does it say to you? How do your own expectations of how things SHOULD be, determine your feelings and behaviors? What coping strategies do you have and use when things aren’t the way you think they SHOULD be? Is your current strategy working for you or do you need to change it? Can you do it on your own or could you benefit from an objective professional to help you think “out of the box”? Whether you are the president of your 1 man or 1 women business or president of the United States, seeking good counsel just makes good sense. You can’t know what you don’t know. A good advisor can help you develop insight, see things more clearly and open new options that you may not  have been aware of or considered.

REBT

Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy or REBT for short was developed by the late and one of perhaps the most influential psychologists of all time, Dr. Albert Ellis. It was the first form of Cognitive Therapy which emphasized the tremendous power of ones’ thoughts, attitudes and beliefs on mood and emotion. It also paid far more attention to one’s present thoughts and behaviors without spending months and even years, exploring early childhood, dreams, the unconscious and related Freudian concepts which were very popular in those days. Now, fifty plus years later, REBT, along with Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT), are the most researched and proven methods for relieving emotional suffering of all sorts and helping people live happier and more satisfying lives.

I am honored to have trained personally with Dr. Ellis and many of the excellent faculty at the Institute for Rational Therapy (now named, The Albert Ellis Institute) from 1980-1981 and to have been a part of the training of other therapists as a certified supervisor of the Institute.

As of next month, I will be offering training and supervision to licensed mental health professionals interested in learning the Art and Science of REBT and applying it with their own clients. Also next month, I will be presenting a 2 hour program on REBT for the graduate psychology interns at the Center for Group Counseling in Boca Raton, FL.

Professionals interested in receiving training and/or supervision should send letter of interest to me at info@robertheller.net.

Social Anxiety Disorder

Earlier this month I met with the Executive Director of the Andrew Kukes Foundation for Social Anxiety. Social anxiety can range from shyness and/ or mild discomfort in talking or being with others to panic-like symptoms and extreme avoidance of most people and social interactions. This pattern can lead to being isolated, picked on, developing low self esteem, severe depression and even suicide.

The purpose of the foundation is to educate mental health professionals about social anxiety and how to treat it and to provide hope, education and treatment options to individuals and their families affected by social anxiety disorder.

Since I have successfully treated many individuals with social anxiety disorder over the years, I was delighted to be included as a referral resource for the organization and possibly participate in future webinars that they may be offering in the near future.

For more information on the organization, visit, www.akfsa.org,

Yoga Therapy

Apart from a form of exercise and even a method of relaxation, more and more research is amassing on the application and integration of Yoga Therapy in the mental health field. As I become a more experienced practitioner of Yoga (Iyengar style) and expand my readings of its uses with depression, anxiety and other mood and mind-body related problems, I find myself wanting to learn more. As a result, next month I will be attending an intensive 3 day workshop on yoga and the body and in June, plan to fly to Boston to attend an international symposium to learn from the leaders in the field, both from a research and clinical perspective.

New Blogs and Articles

I continue to write both blogs and articles, many of which are available for free on my websites, www.cognitivetherapy.cc and www.mentalskillstennis.com. Let me know what topics you are most interested in by e-mailing me at info@robertheller.net

Until next month-

Dr. Robert Heller

If you know someone else who’d be interested in receiving these mailings on mind-body skills and peak performance trainings, please encourage them to sign up through my websites, http://www.mentalskillstennis.com, http://www.cognitivetherapy.cc or send an e-mail to info@robertheller.net with the subject heading, “ATTN: add to e-mail list”.

Visit http://www.cognitivetherapy.ccto view back issues of the newsletter, new articles and blogs and self-help/educational products to get mentally and emotionally fit.

To unsubscribe, send an email to info@robertheller.net with the SUBJECT: Unsubscribe

 

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Dr. Robert Heller’s Mind-Body Newsletter

“Strategies for Healthy Mind, Body and Mind”

February 2013

Quote of the Month

“Channel your worry to concern and concern to action”- Dr.Robert Heller

This is one of my favorite quotes. Worry is such a waste of time and energy drain. It leads to nowhere fast. Concern is when you figure out what you are going to do about whatever it is you are worrying about. Action is your response to the initial worry. The power is in the doing!

Book of the Month

Yoga For Depression by Amy Weintraub

Amy is a yoga teacher and writer who has put together a compelling argument for incorporating yoga into the treatment of depression. She describes her own battles with depression and how yoga has helped her. In fact, many of the case studies she presents are of other well known yoga practitioners, medical doctors and researchers who have found yoga to be a major tool in their own lives to alleviate major depression.  Weintraub presents a mountain of research studies to add to the evidence of yoga’s powerful effect on reducing depression. She also describes and presents several examples of specific yoga poses and practices beneficial in alleviating depression.

However, Weintraub is not talking about taking a once a week yoga class at the local Y. Rather she generally is describing a major lifestyle change that involves daily practice of breath, postures and philosophy.

Like most things in life, big problems require big changes. No easy outs or quick fixes!

Perfectionism: Your Guide to Self Defeat

Perfectionism results in setting the bar too high, well beyond you can realistically reach. Perfectionists are never satisfied with what they have achieved. It is never quite good enough. On the rare occasions that it is, they worry that they won’t be able to keep it up. These attitudes create intense and chronic pressure that can lead to overwhelming anxiety and /or depression and an assortment of physical problems such as headaches, difficulty sleeping and related physical problems.

Here is some straight thinking you can use to change your feelings and behaviors.

1.      Being human means being IMPERFECT.

2.      Strive to do your best and appreciate your efforts.

3.      Let the results take care of themselves.

4.      Making  a mistake doesn’t make you stupid or a failure, just human.

5.      By learning from your mistakes you are already a success.

Upcoming News and Events

It has been a busy few months of writing and a number of articles are now out or soon to be published.

“Vision Training and Sports Performance” describes how imagery and vision exercises can enhance performance in sports. This article appeared in the February edition of Baselines, the magazine of the Florida Professional Tennis Association.

My article, “Mental Skills for Coaches”, will be published in the February issue of ADDvantage Magazine, the publication of the United States Professional Tennis Association.

Finally, “How to Enjoy and Profit from Public Speaking” will be published in the newsletter of the Florida Psychological Association.

My next speaking engagement will be coming up soon. In March, I will be presenting a talk on “Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy” to the psychology interns at the Center for Group Counseling in Boca Raton, Fl.

This month’s special on the self help pocket series features a FREE guidebook with every one you buy. Check out the titles on the products section of www.cognitivetherapy.cc

Until next month…Stay well!

Dr. Robert Heller

Send your comments and suggestions about the newsletter and future topics you would like addressed to me at info@robertheller.net.

If you know someone else who’d be interested in receiving these mailings on mind-body skills and peak performance trainings, please encourage them to sign up through my websites, http://www.mentalskillstennis.com, http://www.cognitivetherapy.cc or send an e-mail to info@robertheller.net with the subject heading, “ATTN: add to e-mail list”.

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Dr. Robert Heller’s Mind-Body Newsletter 

“Strategies for Better Physical and Emotional Health” 

January 2013 

Quote of the Month: “Nobody Can Make You Feel Badly Without Your Consent”

Attributed to Elenore Roosevelt, this quote emphasizes that We are our most important masters of our mind. It is what WE CHOOSE to think and believe that ultimately determines how we feel about ourselves and not what others may think or say about us.

Tips for Happiness in the New Year (from a blog by Andrea Evans www.spreadhappiness.com):

“Happiness is within us. You can’t buy it, eat it, wear it, live in it or ride in it. It is a choice we make. It is a decision to love ourselves fully the way we are today, and love and respect others, freeing ourselves from judgment.

We can encourage our own happiness with:

1. Gratitude: Make a list of all the things you are grateful for.

Type it up and/or record it. Post it, read it, listen to it. Be constantly reminded of your gifts.

2. Give what you want to receive.

If you are seeking love, be more loving. If you are seeking friends, be friendlier. If you are seeking more adventure, be more adventurous.

3. Live your passion.

Think about what you would like to see happen in your life this coming year. Make a list of the steps you need to follow along the path to reach your goals. Activate your plan by taking your first step!” 

How to Keep Your New Year’s Resolutions

New Year’s resolutions are easy to make and often difficult to keep. For starter’s, “Don’t make promises you can’t keep”. Commit to realistic goals that are measurable, objective and can be broken down into smaller components. For example, if you wanted to run a marathon, plan your training over 1-2 years rather than seeking a run in a marathon in 1-2 months.

Another component of keeping resolutions is to get support. Few of us have the knowledge and discipline to accomplish complex tasks alone. A coach and or group of like-minded people can provide useful information and support to help you avoid making common mistakes and keep you on task as you move forward in reaching your goals.

Finally, expect disappointments and set backs. Use them as opportunities to learn and grow rather than as an excuse to give up.

The Cost of Psychotherapy

Psychotherapy, especially based on cognitive behavioral model, tends to be relatively short term. Many clients make substantial progress in 12-20 sessions. Costs per session might vary from $100- 200 per standard 45-50 minute sessions. In many cases clients are reimbursed a significant amount of their fees based on their deductibles and co-payments IF they have a medically diagnosed condition. For those who are functioning well and want to learn to perform even better, the cost can be viewed as an investment in their physical mental well being. For example, you could play golf without ever taking a golf lesson, but you will likely play it better and enjoy it more by taking some lessons from a pro. Interestingly, most pros continue to train with their own pros!

Psychotherapy is a process and not a “quick fix” but for those willing to invest the time, effort and money, the rewards in the improvement in the quality of their lives is often well worth it.

Book Recommendation of the Month

With many American’s wanting to lose weight and keep it off, now would be a great time to get my pocket guidebook, “Weight Management” ( www.cognitivetherapy.cc). The guidebook includes great tips, strategies and resources that are practical and also address some of the cognitive tools useful to manage the emotional components of weight control.

Send your comments and suggestions about the newsletter and future topics you would like addressed to me at info@robertheller.net.

Wishing you all a healthy, happy, peaceful and prosperous New Year!.

Dr. Robert Heller

 

If you know someone else who’d be interested in receiving these mailings on mind-body skills and peak performance trainings, please encourage them to sign up through my websites, http://www.mentalskillstennis.com, http://www.cognitivetherapy.cc or send an e-mail to info@robertheller.net with the subject heading, “ATTN: add to e-mail list”.

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Dr.Robert Heller’s Mind-Body Newsletter

“Peak Performance for Sports, Business and Life”

December 2012

Quote of the Month

“When you get to the end of your rope, tie a knot and hang on.”

This quote from former U.S. President, Franklin D. Roosevelt, a man who became paralyzed from the waist down with polio but learned to walk with braces and rose above his physical limitations to become governor of New York and President of the United States.

Often times, our biggest limitations are the ones we create in our own minds. In Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy and other forms of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, we learn to turn off the faucet of negative thoughts and beliefs and turn on the faucet of positive thoughts and beliefs. The latest version of this approach is Positive Psychology, a growing approach to teaching mental health developed by Dr. Martin Seligman, author of, “Learned Helplessness”. Whether you a struggling with depression or an upset related to a poor performance, the principles and practices apply equally well. The power to change lies within you and a skilled therapist (coach, teacher) can provide you with the skills you need to achieve a higher degree of happiness and satisfaction regardless of your situation  or circumstance.

Article of the Month

“What about hypnosis?”

I have been using hypnosis as a major tool with my clients for over 35 years! Hypnosis is a combination of relaxation and suggestion. When you are in a relaxed and focused state, you can absorb ideas more easily and more quickly. Hypnosis can be used to make changes in how you think, feel and behave. The effectiveness of hypnosis is based on the natural ability of the client and the skill of the hypnotherapist. Hypnotizability in on a continuem with some individuals having great potential to be deeply hypnotized and others to a far lesser extent. Usually, the deeper the individual can go into a very relaxed state, the more powerful the suggestions become. In one case, I was working with a high performing junior tennis player for a while and the suggestions I had mentioned to him repeatedly in our regular sessions just didn’t seem to take hold. When I used the exact same suggestions in “hypnosis”, he responded very well and very quickly.

The scientific literature on the applications of hypnosis is vast and has been successfully applied to a broad range of areas including reducing pain, increasing confidence, helping with anxiety and depression, losing weight, quitting smoking and hundreds of other areas.

When used by a mental health professional skilled in its use, there is virtually no side effects or contraindications for using it. Hypnosis is not a “quick fix” and clients should expect and welcome receiving a complete evaluation of their situation, preparation/education of the process, relaxation development, customized suggestions and installation of suggestions. Usually, a series of 6-12 sessions provides a good basis to judge the effectiveness of hypnosis. I often make a tape recording for my clients for at-home practice and to be used for reinforcement and future use. I have written some blogs and articles of this topic at www.cognitivetherapy.cc  and www.mentalskillstennis.com.

Closing Thoughts

As we approach the end of another year I want to thank all of my readers, clients, colleagues ,friends and family for their support and trust. I hope that I have made some small difference in your lives. You have certainly made a difference in mine.

Best wishes for a happy and healthy New Year.

Dr. Robert Heller

If you know someone else who’d be interested in receiving these mailings on mind-body skills and peak performance trainings, please encourage them to sign up through my websites, http://www.mentalskillstennis.com, http://www.cognitivetherapy.cc or send an e-mail to info@robertheller.net with the subject heading, “ATTN: add to e-mail list”. Thank you.

Be sure to check out the new blogs and articles on each of the websites as they are updated farily regularly.

If you have ideas for future articles or questions about your own performance, send them to me at info@robertheller.net.

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Dr. Robert Heller’s Mind-Body Newsletter

“Strategies for Performing at Your Best in Sports and In Life”

November 2012

QUOTE OF THE MONTH

“Nothing Succeeds Like Success”

Confidence is built upon succeeding at gradually and progressively more challenging tasks. Too little challenge and the success become meaningless. Too much challenge and frustration builds up leading to a lack of effort and an assumption of failure.

This month, why not set a goal and break it down into smaller tasks of increasing difficult that you can reasonably expect to succeed in with a consistent amount of moderate effort.

Performance Anxiety

This week, PBS featured a story of a former female soccer star who upon learning that a scout for the Olympic team was watching her play, “choked” and missed blocking a relatively easy ball in her position as goalie. Although she didn’t make the Olympic team, she turned the disappointment into a quest to understand and manage the problem of “choking” not only within herself but for the thousands of people who choke, freeze up or under perform whether it be on the playing field, taking a test or speaking in front of an audience. She is now making it her life’s work to develop strategies for performing at your best.

One of her experiments evaluated the effectiveness of “journaling” in improving performance. She divided up a group high school students who were nervous about taking their biology test. The control group did not receive any treatment while the experimental group was asked to write about their fears and worries for 10 minutes just before the start of the test. The result was that the control group scored n average of B- on their test, while the experimental group scored an average of B + on their test.

It would seem then, that the act of writing about one’s fears and worries, reduces the anxiety and results in an improved performance.

Performing at Your Best

Tennis great Roger Federer is a great person to investigate when seeking strategies to perform at your best. He uses a strategy commonly found in yoga and meditation practices, “being in the present moment”. According to Federer, “I try to stay very much in the present tense. To think only about the moment I am in the point and to not even think about that if I can.”

Of the many excellent strategies to perform at your best, “forgetting” is my favorite. In the heat of battle, great players look forward and not back. When you turn off the volume of your television and just look at the body language, it is very difficult to tell if the player has won or lost the point. Their emotional expression remains relatively unchanged. As soon as the point is over, it’s over. They are already focused on the next shot. So, work on “selective forgetting”.

NEWS

The workshop of Yoga and Sports: Blending yoga and psychology for improved results, is being re-scheduled for February.

Dr.Robert Heller was recently interviewed by USTA magazine regarding his sports psychology consulting with tennis players. You can view the article on www.mentalskillstennis.com

Other

If you know someone else who’d be interested in receiving these mailings on mind-body skills and peak performance trainings, please encourage them to sign up through my websites, www.mentalskillstennis.com, http://www.cognitivetherapy.cc or send an e-mail to info@robertheller.net with the subject heading, “ATTN: add to e-mail list”. Thank you.

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Dr. Robert Heller’s Self Improvement Newsletter

“Mind-Body Strategies for Healthier Living”

October 2012

Quote of the Month

“Be careful of what you think about. Your thoughts become words, your words become actions, your actions become habits, your habits become your character… and your character becomes your destiny.”

A key tenant of cognitive therapy is the role our thoughts play in our moods and actions. Habits, once acquired, become difficult to change.  This month’s featured article will address the first part of the change process and provide you with a practical exercise.

Defeating Negative Thinking

Negative thinking is easy to acquire and once it becomes a habit, requires consistent effort to change. Defeating negative thinking requires you to first become aware of what your negative thoughts and when they occur. Next, you need to make a list of the negative thoughts. Then, you need to come up with a “better” thought to “replace” the negative thought and practicing thinking and saying the replacement thought whenever the negative thought comes to mind. You must practice saying the new healthier thought STRONGLY and PASSIONATELY in order to get a change at the feeling level.

Defeating negative thinking requires systematic practice. Here is a mental exercise you can practice with:

I use this with tennis players, although you can see how easily it can be adapted to use with other sports or even in non-athletic related situations.

Here is a list of common negative thoughts associated with playing competitive tennis. For each negative statement, write a more desirable positive statement.

1. Oh no. I have to play this opponent in the first round, I have lost to him twice before.

2. I can’t believe I missed that shot. What’s wrong with me?

3. I am down 3-0. I don’t have a chance.

4. That’s the second backhand I missed. My backhand is the worst.

5. I double faulted on game point. I really suck.

6. I should be killing this guy. I’m so much better and I’m down 3-1.

7. It’s unbelievable. That’s the second shot of mine that hit the line and he called it out. What a cheater!

8. I was ahead the entire set and now it’s 5-5. I’m terrible. I’ll probably end up blowing the set and losing the match.

9. My overhead was great in practice all week and now in the match I have missed 2 of them.

10. I can’t get over that bad call last game. It was such an important point.

Write any additional negative thoughts that are specific to your situation on the piece of paper.

On a separate sheet of paper for each negative thought, come up with a more desirable thought to counter the negative one.

Now you have completed the first step in defeating negative thinking.

The Risks of Anti-Depressant Medications for Young Adults

According to an article published in the Washington Post several years ago, widely used anti-depressants DOUBLED the risk of suicide behavior in young adults aged 18-25. After concerns were raised in the Netherlands about the suicide risk, there was a 22 percent drop from 2003 to 2005 in anti-depressant prescriptions for patients under 18, which resulted in a 50% increase in suicides. This poses a dilemma of when and for whom to prescribe these medications for and suggests a careful and comprehensive evaluation be conducted to decide on the best treatment approaches on a case by case basis. For more help on understanding and managing depression, see my pocket sized guidebook, DEPRESSION, available on the products page at www.cognitivetherapy.cc

Upcoming Events

On Saturday, October 20th, from 3-5:30pm,  I will be presenting a workshop with owner and yoga teacher, Stephanie Streff of Yoga Sol in Delray Beach, Florida. The topic will be “Yoga and Athletic Performance: Blending Yoga and Psychology for Improved Results”. I will be presenting useful ideas on mental skills training while Stephanie will provide instruction in key poses for improving flexibility, strength and balance. Cost is $45 or $35 each with a friend. The workshop will be limited to a maximum of 25 participants. No yoga experience is needed and it is open to athletes of all sports and skill levels. To register, call 561-272-8699.

Other

If you know someone else who’d be interested in receiving these mailings on mind-body skills and peak performance trainings, please encourage them to sign up through my websites, www.mentalskillstennis.com, http://www.cognitivetherapy.cc or send an e-mail to info@robertheller.net with the subject heading, “ATTN: add to e-mail list”. Thank you.

Be sure to check out the new blogs and articles on each of the websites as they are updated fairly regularly.

If you have ideas for future articles or questions about your own performance, send them to me at info@robertheller.net.

Visit www.cognitivetherapy.cc to view back issues of the newsletter, new articles and blogs and self-help/educational products to get mentally and emotionally fit.

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Dr.Robert Heller’s Mind-Body Newsletter 

“Peak Performance Strategies for Better Living” 

July, 2012 

“THE MAKING OF A CHAMPION”

60 minutes featured a segment on the current number 1 men’s tennis player in the world from the small country of Serbia, Novak Djokovic and his amazing journey from practicing tennis between the bombings in his country to holding the Wimbledon Trophy above his head.

His interest started at age 5 and his talent was recognized by a local tennis pro early on as well. She not only taught him the game but mentored him, even exposed him to classical music which he still listens to and attributes to helping him stay calm under pressure. He dreamed big from the beginning seeing himself as holding the Wimbledon Trophy one day. His parents were working class people who owned a pizza shop and making a better life was a big motivation for his commitment for hard work and managing adversity. Tennis was his way out to a better life and he has taken full advantage of it.

The Dalai Lama on Piers Morgan

In broken English, this humble, friendly and happy man openly talked about his life and views. During the interview, he smiled and laughed a lot. Other than tasting a few drops of wine at the age of 8, he has stayed totally clear of all alcohol and drugs. When asked why, his response was simple: No Need. A calm and clear mind is its own reward and is fine the way it is. Do you need another reason to practice meditation?

Helping Athletes Cope

My two hour presentation to fellow psychologists on Helping Athletes Cope, was well received. Many colleagues reinforced my own view of the importance of Off Court Experiences on On Court Performances and the value of personal counseling to develop “life skills” in addition to their sports related skills. One colleague at a division one school, has the support of the coaches and the administration who contracts with her to confidentially see any athlete confidentially and for free!

Yoga at Any Age

In my recent presentation on Helping Athletes Cope, I showed a video of the world’s number 1 female tennis player, Maria Sharapova, doing and commenting on why she practices yoga. A distinguished and vibrant colleague in her 80’s shared she regularly participates in a yoga class and asked me to join her in doing “downward dog”!

Upcoming Events

A joint workshop on Yoga and Athletic Performance is in the works for October. I will be teaming up with Iyengar Yoga teacher, Stephanie Streff, owner of Yoga Sol in Delray Beach, Florida for a unique program combining modern western psychology practices with ancient yoga practices to enhance performance and coping skills. Stay tuned for details. 

Other

If you know someone else who’d be interested in receiving these mailings on mind-body skills and peak performance trainings, please encourage them to sign up through my websites, www.mentalskillstennis.com , www.cognitivetherapy.cc or send an e-mail to info@robertheller.net with the subject heading, “ATTN: add to e-mail list”. Thank you.

Be sure to check out the new blogs and articles on each of the websites as they are updated farily regularly.

If you have ideas for future articles or questions about your own performance, send them to me at info@robertheller.net.

Visit www.cognitivetherapy.cc. to view back issues of the newsletter, new articles and blogs and self-help/educational products to get mentally and emotionally fit.

 

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Dr. Heller’s Mind-Body Newsletter 

“Strategies for Performing at Your Best”

June 2012

 

Sports Lessons

This month has provided us with watching the world’s best athletes competing in Tennis, Basketball and Hockey. The French Open, The NBA playoffs and the Stanley Cup Finals provide valuable insights into how the best of the best perform under pressure. Individual and team sports provide different challenges and rewards:

Team sports highlight leadership skills, cooperation, selflessness, and picking up the slack when others may be lax or in need of help or support. Individual sports exemplify playing under pressure and self reliance.

Most top athletes play well under pressure, remain confident during periods of poor play and know how to “come back” when behind in the game. Resiliency, tenacity and persistence are adjectives that come to mind when I watch these contests. The superior athletes have great self discipline and self control. They think well on their feet and make and execute split second decisions

These attributes are part innate, part learned and continuously reinforced through on going practice and experience.

As you watch your favorite sport and athletes perform, pay attention to their emotional reactivity. Notice how they respond to adversity and success. Think about how you can apply their reactions to how you respond to difficult and challenging situations.

Breath Control

Pay attention to your breathing and seek to breathe as slowly, smoothly and deeply as you possibly can. As you practice and improve your capacity to relax, you will find yourself benefiting in many ways including: Being less bothered by stressful events and people, recovering more quickly from adversity and increasing your level of energy.

To practice deep breathing, place your hands on your belly and focus on breathing slowly, and continuously for 5 minutes. Notice the feelings and sensations that you begin to have. Focus on the words: “Breath In, Breath Out”,  or the image of a balloon filling up as you breath in and deflate as you breath out. Have the goal to spend more of your day engaging in this “relaxed breathing.”

Test Anxiety

As students prepare to take national tests to help get into colleges and professional schools, they often seek to bolster their test taking skills by working with private tutors or taking classes on “How to prepare for a test” or “Test Taking Skills”.

One area often neglected in test preparation in “Test Anxiety Reduction Training”. Many of us get overly nervous when taking important exams. Anxiety negatively affects our ability to think, concentrate and recall, even well studied facts. We are far more likely to be careless and make costly mistakes when we are nervous.  While taking practice tests can sometimes bolster confidence, they can also torpedo confidence if high levels of anxiety are present.

One of my specialties is helping folks successfully cope with anxiety. As a former school psychologist, I developed and implemented workshops and individual programs to help students and others preparing to take important tests feel calm and focused before and during tests, insuring they could perform to the best of the skills and abilities. 

Upcoming Events

On Friday, June 22, I will be presenting a sport psychology workshop for the Florida Psychological Association on,”Helping Athletes Cope.” The event, held in St. Petersburg, brings psychologists from around the State to participate in educational workshops along with some much needed R&R!

OTHER

If you know someone else who’d be interested in receiving these mailings on mind-body skills and peak performance trainings, please encourage them to sign up through my websites, www.mentalskillstennis.com , www.cognitivetherapy.cc or send an e-mail to info@robertheller.net with the subject heading, “ATTN: add to e-mail list”. Thank you.

Be sure to check out the new blogs and articles on each of the websites as they are updated farily regularly.

If you have ideas for future articles or questions about your own performance, send them to me at info@robertheller.net.

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DR. HELLER’S MENTAL SKILLS NEWSLETTER

“Peak Performance for Mind and Body”

May 2012

Quote of the Month

“Make Each Day Count Rather Than Count Each Day”

So many people procrastinate and avoid seizing the moment and taking action to achieve a goal. They put things off with excuses like, “I will do it later”, “I’m too tired.”, “It’s too hard”.  Afterwards we think, “I would of…, could of… should off…”.  To avoid regrets, act now!

The take away:

Pick one of the following quotes or affirmations that best resonate with you and review them regularly.

“A stitch in time saves nine.”

“Strike while the iron is hot.”

“He who hesitates is lost.”

“Don’t put off until tomorrow what you can do today.”

“Do it now!”

“To avoid regrets, act now!”

FEATURED ARTICLE:

Vision Training and Sports Performance

Good vision is certainly important to be able to perform at your best in sports. If your eyes are imperfect, you may need glasses or contact lenses to see at your best. In sunlight, sunglasses can reduce the glare of the sun allowing you to see more clearly and recover more quickly if you are forced to look into the sun. But beyond having basic good vision, can specific visual training improve our performance in sports? Many top Olympic athletes, professional athletes and coaches think so.

One aspect of visual training, guided visualization, is a method frequently used by sports psychologists. In guided visualization, the athlete is first taught how to relax through a combination of deep breathing, isometric exercises and/or meditative techniques. Once the body is quiet, the mind is able to more easily focus on imagining words and images. Guided imagery using mental rehearsal is the most common of the visual strategies: The tennis player might rehearse a perfect serve with a series of images from the starting position, ball toss, point of contact and the ball landing close to the desired target across the net. The golfer might picture the roll of his put from his club head to dropping right into the hole and the basketball player might imagine faking left, dribbling right and making an easy lay-up for the backboard.

Some optometrists have developed specific training methods to improve a variety of visually related skills which can directly enhance athletic performance. One such professional is Dr. Lawrence Lampert who practices in Boca Raton, Florida. He has a series of exercises he provides clients with  to train specific vision skills. The skills are designed to help the athlete pick up objects more clearly, track them longer and more easily switch the types of vision used in sports, for example a narrow versus wide visual field. His book is “The Pro’s Edge: Vision Training for Golf.”

Although visual training may not be for everyone, I think that the serious competitive athlete looking for a winning edge should include vision training in the course of their overall skills development.

Upcoming Appearances and Activities

On Saturday, May 26th, I will be presenting a 2-hour workshop on “Blending Ancient Practices (yoga and meditation) with Modern Psychology (cognitive behavioral therapy) for Improved Performance.” The program will be held at the Yoga Sol studio in Delray Beach, Florida. It is open to all. For details go to www.yogasol.com.

On May 29th, I will be attending the Florida United States Professional Tennis Teachers (USPTA) conference in Port St. Lucie, Florida. I expect to pick up some “state of the art strategies” to improve my game and that of my clients.

On June 22nd, I will be presenting a 2-hour workshop on “Helping Athletes Cope” at the Florida Psychological Convention held at the PGA resort in West Palm Beach, Florida.

My newest book, “Winning Ways,” will have 365 ideas to enhance your performance and your life. Every day, a new idea will help you focus on a helpful thought and action or activity to feel and function and better. If you have a brief thought or activity that you would like to suggest, please send it to me at info@robertheller.net.

OTHER

If you know someone else who’d be interested in receiving these mailings on mind-body skills and peak performance trainings, please encourage them to sign up through my websites, www.mentalskillstennis.com , www.cognitivetherapy.cc or send an e-mail to info@robertheller.net with the subject heading, “ATTN: add to e-mail list”. Thank you.

Be sure to check out the new blogs and articles on each of the websites as they are updated farily regularly.

If you have ideas for future articles or questions about your own performance, send them to me at info@robertheller.net.

 

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DR.ROBERT HELLER’S MIND-BODY NEWSLETTER

“Helping You to Feel and Perform at your Best”

March 2012

Quote of the Month

“Action is the antidote to despair”- Joan Baez

I didn’t know singer Joan Baez was also a behavioral psychologist. Often times in working with clients they are very good about doing assignments between sessions if it involves reading or writing assignments but fall short when they have to deliver on making a change in their behavior. In cognitive-behavioral therapy, we believe that by changing your thoughts AND behaviors, you are able to change your feelings. Today, think about what ACTION you can take to improve something in your life.

COUNSELING BY COMPUTER

I have been counseling people by phone for years and using video conferencing with SKYPE over the past several years. It’s convenient and has allowed me to help individuals who don’t live near my office in Boca Raton, Fl. In fact, I am currently working with someone from Spain. Now, according to Dr.Lynn Bufka of the American Psychological Association, long distance counseling via Skype is earning respectability and studies are underway in psychology and medicine to determine just how helpful this approach can be.

RITALIN GONE WRONG

This story in the Sunday New York Times tracks the history and highlights some recent study on the drugging of children who are alleged to have Attention Deficit Disorder. Rather than putting kids on drugs that do nothing to change the conditions that derail their development in the first place, the author sites studies that conclude “There has been clear evidence that the developing brain is shaped by experience”. As a former school psychologist for 8 years, I can tell you that teaching kids how to relax and concentrate and parents and teachers how to manage kids’ behaviors often work as well or better than drugs, have no negative side effects and tend to last.

TECHNIQUES FOR OVERCOMING PROCRASTINATION

One of my favorite techniques is the 5 minute plan. We can do almost anything for 5 minutes. Make a deal with yourself to work on anything you have been procrastinating about for 5 minutes. After that time you can stop if you like and you are “successful”.  If you “choose’ to continue longer you may. Often times, folks find by overcoming the initial inertia they can keep things rolling more easily.

NEW ARTICLES ON SPORTS ISSUES

If you are Director of a sports facility or a sports coach, you may want to check out my new article which focuses on what business practices you can use to retain customers, members and students in tough economic times. It appears in the March issue of Racket Sports Industry and will soon be available on my website, www.cognitivetherapy.cc .

My most recent article on “Developing Confidence” will soon be coming out in FIT TENNIS newsletter.

UPCOMING EVENTS

In June , I will be presenting a workshop on Sports Psychology for the Florida Psychological Association. The next newsletter will feature an article on the CBS” 60 Minutes” segment that just aired on Depression and the Placebo Effect. The story generated an enormous amount of interest and controversy.

Until next time-

Dr.Robert Heller

www.cognitivetherapy.cc

info@robertheller.net

561 451-2731

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DR.ROBERT HELLER’S MIND BODY NEWSLETTER

Performing Your Best in Sport and in Life”

December, 2011

 Quote of the Month

“We either make ourselves miserable, or we make ourselves strong. The amount of work is the same.”- Carlos Castaneda.

I love this philosophy because it is so empowering, knowing that we can control our feelings, largely by controlling our thoughts. Think about how your thoughts affect your emotions and behaviors and how changing them might help you feel and behavior better.

Book of the Month

“A Year of Living Your Yoga” by Dr. Judith Lasater. Dr. Lasater is a psychologist, physical therapist and advanced teacher of the Iyengar style of yoga. Her book provides a daily idea to focus on for each day of the year. As I sit down to write this newsletter, today’s selection is, “Schedule yourself a pajama day once a week. We are so busy, busy, busy. Every week, plan ahead for a day or part of a day when you can stay home and rest or do simple tasks. Resting is part of life, too.”

Reading an idea out loud at the beginning of each day helps set your course in the right direction: An excellent investment of a few seconds of time.

RECOVERY FROM VIGOROUS EXERCISE WITH CHOCOLATE MILK

A series of recent studies and reviews concludes that good “old-fashioned” chocolate milk is an excellent post-exercise drink and is being increasingly used by high endurance athletes. Compared to plain milk, water or most sports drinks it has double the carbohydrates and protein content needed to replenish tired muscles. It has the bonus of providing added calcium, tastes good and is inexpensive. Where is my Hershey’s syrup?

THANKSGIVING

As the holidays are upon us, the idea of “An attitude of gratitude” has never been more important. Counting our blessings rather than our misfortunes is not new but actually DOING it may be. Do you take time to appreciate how fortunate you are? Do you acknowledge important people in your life? Do you give back when and wherever you can?

This year, I reflected on people who are important to me both near and far, and took time to make a brief phone call or to send an e-mail to let them know it. As a part of “giving back”, this year I am going to give something to our military personnel, many who have suffered tremendously as a result on our countries wars. Here it is:

FREE BOOKS TO MILITARY PERSONNEL, VETERANS AND THEIR FAMILIES

I am giving complimentary copies of the following books while supplies last to military personnel, veterans and families. My “self help” series includes pocket sized educational guides on the following topics: Anger, Marriage, Alcohol, Drugs. Visit the product section of my website, www.cognitivetherapy.cc to learn more about each publication. Then, e-mail your request with your mailing address. I will even pay the postage. Please only 1 book per household.

For non-military folks, the guidebooks make great presents to friends, families and colleagues. See the website for a listing of all 14 titles. Until Christmas, buy any 2 and get a third one for free!

Wishing you a warm holiday season with friends and family,

Dr. Bob

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Dr. Robert Heller’s Mind-Body Newsletter
“Helping You Perform at Your Best”
November  2011
Quote of the Month “What’s important is to keep learning, to enjoy challenge, and to tolerate ambiguity. In the end there are no certain answers.”
What a wonderful set of ideas to embrace. Just imagine the possibilities of experiencing greater, joy, less stress, frustration and fear and improved performance. Of the three ideas, tolerating ambiguity seems to be the greatest challenge. Many individuals have developed a “need for certainty” and control. The challenge is to gradually reduce the control over situations and others and tolerate the initial discomfort. Then, by seeing that nothing awful happens you can become more comfortable with “letting go”. Ambiguity then becomes something to be curious about and not afraid of.
Using Surveys to Improve Performance
This past month I have written two articles which will be published over the next few months on the value and uses of surveys for businesses and organizations. I often use surveys with my own clients to evaluate how well they are doing and to get feedback as to how effective I am with them.
You can develop a “personal survey” to rate particular goals and evaluate your progress towards accomplishing them. For example, this past month as I was preparing to give a presentation on Mental Skills for Golf, I was reminded of the power of a pre-shot ritual and the use of imagery to see the results I wanted.  I applied this to my first serve in tennis. I kept track of my progress and noticed that the percentage of first serves I was able to make increased from 60-80% over a 2-week period.
As I reviewed more than 2 dozen books on Mental Skills for Golf, I found quotes by many of the top professional golfers describing how they successfully used imagery. The use of a written survey is a way to keep score of your “mental progress”.
Mental Skills for Golf- and Beyond
A two-year study by two sport psychologists and two PGA pros resulted in the development of a 146 question survey on Mental Skills in Golf. It was administered to a large sample of golfers and resulted in identifying 10 major attributes associated with golf performance. The items had very good predictability in determining the relative scores of the golfers based on their mental skills. It also found that three of these ten mental skills were associated with 99% of the mental problems golfers encountered. There were low levels of confidence, concentration and the ability to tolerate stress.In my Mental Skills for Golf presentation, NONE of the 24 participants were able to correctly identify these top 3 factors.
Another study on mental skills training found that 75% of participants felt mental skills was a very important component of performing well in a sport, yet, on average, the group practiced learning or training their mental skills 5% of the time or less.
Anecdotal feedback from my clients who use my TENNISMIND, CD-Rom mental conditioning program report learning useful mental skills that transferred to their performance in as little as 2 weeks of daily 10-minute training sessions. This is similar to results reported to me in the informal study I conducted with the women’s golf team at Lynn University. Here, putting skills were measured and found to improve by 80% of the team members who trained with golf-specific mental conditioning tapes.
Thanksgiving Special (offer good until November 24, 2011) Order 1 TENNISMIND CD-Rom program at the regular price and get a second copy for FREE! www.mentalskillstennis.com
Best to all-
Dr. Bob
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DR. ROBERT HELLER’S

MIND-BODY NEWSLETTER

“PEAK PERFORMANCE IN SPORTS AND IN LIFE”

October, 2011

Quote of the Month

“I can’t give you a sure-fire formula for success, but I can give you a formula for failure: Try to please everybody all the time”- Herbert Bayard Swope

Getting along with others is a great goal to live harmoniously in society. When carried to an extreme, it makes us overly anxious and limits us in getting what we want. “People pleasing” or caring too much what other’s think about us, fearing their disapproval and/or rejection is based on the mistaken notion that we “need” other’s approval in order to feel good about ourselves and worthwhile. In essence, it is basing our self-worth on getting the stamp of approval from someone else. The late great psychologist, Dr. Albert Ellis termed this “love slobism”. In sports, it is played out all the time by those who get “nervous” when other’s are watching them perform; your team on the tennis court, your foursome on the golf course, or taking a foul shot during a basketball game. By learning to cultivate, “unconditional self-worth”, you can eventually strike a healthy balance between caring about what others think of you and what you think of yourself.

Yoga and You

My friend, former tennis partner, and medical doctor turned yoga guru, Dr. Tim McCall is working on his second book related to Yoga Therapy. He has identified over 50 different medical conditions that document yoga’s usefulness in and many of the mechanisms by which yoga can improve aerobic fitness, blood pressure and respiratory function. He also reported on how yoga is being used in the rehabilitating sports-related injuries like those that impact the rotator cuff.

Jewish High Holidays and Sports Performance

This month is the start of Rosh Hashanah a period of self-reflection ending 10 days later with Yom Kippur and a renewed commitment to living in a purposeful and meaningful way.  When applied more narrowly to sports, reflection leads to awareness and awareness leads to opportunities to re-evaluate current practices and the choice to do things in a way that allows us to continue to grow and develop in our chosen sports and as people. You don’t need to be Jewish to benefit by this ancient ritual of self-reflection not does in have to be done only in October. Awareness Training can be an effective component of mental skills for athletes of all sports.

Fit Tennis

Fit Tennis is a newsletter recently started by my colleague, tennis teaching professional, Chris Hagman. I have agreed to write occasional articles for it. My first one appeared on September 18 and was on “Cardio Tennis”. Upcoming articles will address the issue of how to maintain your commitment to physical health and training and ways the fitness industry can inspire and provide incentives to remain actively involved in health and wellness practices.

Mental Skills for Golf

On Thursday, October 27th, I will be presenting a talk on “Mental Skills for Golf: How to Win the ‘Inner Game’”.  This will be followed by a 6 week course where participants will learn to assess their mental strengths and weaknesses, manage their emotions, use imagery and self talk for improved performance and develop concentration and focusing skills to help players lower their scores.  The program is sponsored by the Center for Group Counseling located on Boca Rio Road in Boca Raton, FL. For details, call them at 561 483-5300.

That’s it for this month.

Best to all-

Dr. Bob

If you know someone else who’d be interested in receiving these mailings on mind-body skills and peak performance trainings, please encourage them to sign up through my websites, www.mentalskillstennis.com , www.cognitivetherapy.cc or send an e-mail to info@robertheller.net with the subject heading, “ATTN: add to e-mail list”. Thank you.

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DR. HELLER’S MIND-BODY NEWSLETTER

“PERFORMING YOUR BEST IN SPORTS AND IN LIFE”

September 2011

Quote of the Month

“We should be too big to take offense and too noble to give it”. Abe LincolnBig Abe could have been referring to what we popularly call, “the ego”- our sense of self worth. When we feel secure within ourselves we don’t have to prove ourselves to others or strive overly hard to win other’s approval. We are less likely to feel attacked or threatened or take offense by minor things and more able to forgive and forget when others act badly.

The Snare of Perfectionism

“When Artists Aim Too High”. That’s the headline of an article in the Wall Street Journal that talks about “the curse of perfectionism” being a source of grief not only for those suffer from it but by those who work with them. In referring to performing artists, “the trick is not to let it interfere with getting things done”. My mentor and teacher, the late, great psychologist, Dr.Albert Ellis was a prolific writer who produced hundred’s of articles and dozens of books, in part because he didn’t try to do it perfectly and wasn’t overly concerned with what others thought of his work.

The Power of Meditation

The relatively simple practice of meditation is finding its way in helping the thousands of wounded warriors coming back from the wars suffering from severe trauma and diagnosed with post traumatic stress disorder. Practicing for two twenty minute periods each day for an eight week period showed a 50% reduction in symptoms in a recent study. If it can be that helpful to those afflicted with the most serious of psychological problems, imagine how it might improve your life. I often teach my clients variations of relaxation methods not only to overcome specific problems but to improve the overall quality of their lives.

Hypnosis and Smoking

I recently was interviewed by Dr.Abbey Strauss, a psychiatrist who heads a program where he invites experts in various specialties of mental health to speak on the topic. The program is taped and available to be listened to free of charge! During the 20 minute interview, I discussed how hypnosis can be applied to smoking cessation and other addictive behavior. The interview will soon be available on my website for you to listen to free of charge.  Many of the hypnotic and non-hypnotic suggestions are included in my self-help guide, “Freedom From Tobacco”, available on the products section of my website, www.cognitivetherapy.cc.

Upcoming Events

In September, I will be retuning to the fabulous Lake Mohonk Resort in New Paltz, New York to give a presentation on “Mental Skills for Tennis and Golf”.

In October, I will be giving a talk at the Center for Group Counseling in Boca Raton on “Mental Skills for Golf” as an introduction to a 6 week course. If you would like to participate, forward me your name, e-mail address and phone number and I will be sure you receive the sign up information when it is available.

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DR. HELLER’S MIND-BODY NEWSLETTER FOR PERFORMING AT YOUR BEST
May 2011

Quote of the Month “The one important thing I have learned over the years  is the difference between taking one’s work seriously and taking one’s self seriously. The first is imperative, the second is disastrous.”- Margot Foteyn  (world class prima  ballerina)

Think about where you fit in. What’s your emotional perspective? Do you need to separate out your performance from you self-worth?

Feature Article

“Getting from Good to Great” A recent story in the Wall Street Journal high lighting the impending rise of tennis superstar Novak Djokovic towards becoming the number one tennis player in the world raised some thought provoking reflection on what really are the main factors that lead to athletic greatness.

Coming from the tiny, poor, war torn country of Serbia, how is it that Novak and several others of his countrymen and women are among the best tennis players in the world? These players often lack the state of the art training facilities, coaching and equipment so often available to other players from wealthier countries and thought to be fundamental to athletic success. According to interviews, these players appear to start their sports later in life, don’t train as hard as their counterparts from other countries in the world and often have only limited support from their families who are too busy surviving and scraping out a living.

Do they just have far more talent than the rest of the pack? Are they more committed to making it due to their harsh life circumstances? Do they perform better under pressure because winning or losing a tennis match is not nearly as scary as getting hit by a bomb or bullet? Hopefully, journalists will follow up on these and other questions to help tease out the ingredients that help these elite athletes get to the top against all odds.

“Fits of Rage”

That’s the title of my newest article which appeared in the May 2011 issue of TennisLife Magazine. In the article, I highlight the bad behaviors of tennis legend, John McEnroe and turn things around to show readers what positive lessons we can learn from celebrities with major anger problems. For help with understanding and managing anger in yourself and others, go the products tab of www.mentalskillstennis.com and pick up your copy of “Anger Management”.

“Freedom From Distractibility”

Would you like to be a part of one of my next articles? Send your thoughts and suggestions to info@robertheller.net of the problems and solutions to improving concentration, attention and focus. Include your name and city and you could be “in print”.

“Top 10 Mistakes Sports Parents Make”

Are you the parent, coach or instructor of a young athlete? Now is your chance to contribute your ideas on this very important topic. In preparing for this upcoming article, I invite you to list 1 or 2 of the biggest mistakes you have made as a parent or observed in other parents. You don’t have to give your name. It’s not about blame but learning from mistakes. E-mail to me at info@robertheller.net.

NEWS AND EVENTS My presentation on “Sports Psychology: Helping Athlete’s Cope” was well received by the 34 attendees of the Palm Beach Chapter of the Florida Psychological Association. During the 2-hour workshop, I shared the essential features of Psychological Skills Training for sports and the types of clients and cases I have worked with over the past 20 plus years.

I was a guest on the Florida Psychiatric Association’s public webinar series and discussed the role of Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy in both treating psychological problems such as fears and phobias and in working with athletes. REBT is a highly effective form of cognitive behavioral therapy, especially useful with anxiety and depression.

On June 2nd, I will be teaming up with a yoga teacher who works with athletes in presenting a talk and demonstration for tennis teaching professionals at the Florida USPTA’s annual convention. I will be discussing how ancient yoga philosophy and meditation practices along with modern cognitive and behavioral therapy methods can improve athletic performance.

Send your questions and comments to me at info@robertheller.net. If you like this newsletter, forward to your friends and relatives or have them sign up at www.mentalskillstennis.com.

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DR. HELLER’S MIND-BODY NEWSLETTER

“Peak Performance Training for Athletics, Business and Life”

APRIL  2011

Quote of the Month

“When we long for life without difficulties, remind us that the oaks grow strong in contrary winds and diamonds are made under pressure”-Peter Marshall

The take away from this quote is to embrace challenges and competition. This is what makes you stronger. Part of the reason Nick Bolliteri produced so many tennis champions is that he housed a large talent pool that had the opportunity to compete with and against each other: pushing each other to improve. Michael Chang, Jim Courier, Aaron Krickstein, Andre Agassi and so many more were at the same place at the same time. What an opportunity for growth and development of athletic excellence!

YOGA FOR KIDS

A recent article in the Wall Street Journal reported on two separate studies which found that yoga improved student’s behavior, physical health and academic performance and reduced feelings of helplessness and aggression. In numerous schools across the United States, yoga is being added to the curriculums in elementary schools. Most programs combine breath work with yoga poses and do not incorporate the spiritual or philosophical aspects of the practice. Yoga is already a regular practice for many top athletes so incorporating aspects of yoga into the training of young athletes is probably a very good idea.

OBESITY IN TEENAGERS

Nearly one in five teenagers are obese, more than triple the rate from 1980, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (reported in the Wall St. Journal). High blood pressure and cholesterol are increasingly turning up in younger people. My contribution to helping teens and adults cope is the pocket-sized self-help publication, “Weight Management”. The colored, illustrated, laminated and “small book” can easily be carried in a pocket or purse for convenient “on the spot use” whenever thoughts or urges to make unhealthy eating choices arise. Carrying a “transitional object” increases awareness and provides ready support to those who want to change their relationship with food but are easily distracted by stresses of life and the easy accessibility of cheap but poor food options available to them.

MIND OVER MATTER

I recently attended the annual conference of the Anxiety Disorders Association of America. Many of the presentations focused on incorporating the eastern meditation practice of “Mindfulness”. Mindfulness is simply noticing and becoming aware of your thoughts and feelings WITHOUT reacting or judging them. In what appears to be a paradoxical effect, “awareness without judgment” is believed to produce change “without trying”.  So, next time you make a mistake, practice noticing it without reacting to it. Resist the urge to judge it or change it. Observe it and let it pass on by!

UPCOMING EVENTS

On April 15, I will be presenting a workshop for psychologists on “Sport Psychology: Helping Athletes Cope”. On May 17th, I will be giving a presentation on “Managing Dental Fears” to the North Palm Beach Dental Society. On June 2, I will be presenting to the USPTA tennis professional on “Blending Ancient Practices and Modern Psychology for Improved Performance”. My newest article, “Ask Dr.Heller” is now out in Tennis Life Magazine.

See you next month!

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February 2011

“Nobody can make you feel inferior without your consent.” Eleanor Roosevelt.

What a great quote. I like it so much I have it displayed on my business card!

Most of us wrongly believe that other people of events directly cause us to FEEL a certain way. Mrs. Roosevelt reminds us that ultimately WE determine how we feel by what we CHOOSE to think. The power of our thoughts and beliefs are so strong that they can largely determine our mood whether it is anxiety, anger, fear or depression. For more information on how this works, see the new articles on my clinical website, www.cognitivethereapy.cc and see how approaches like Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy and Cognitive Therapy, can improve your mood, outlook and performance- both on and off the court!

This month’s feature article is:

“Improving Your Game Through Self Study”

Practice, match play, clinics and lessons are all ways to improve your performance. However, don’t neglect the importance of self-study. As you may recall from school, some of the best students and performers on tests are those who not only listened and attended class regularly but “studied their notes” prior to the tests, reviewed their work in study groups with others and generally put in the “extra” time and effort. You can improve your game by following a similar strategy.

Here are examples of some specific things you can do:

1.      After a lesson or clinic takes notes on what you learned. Review the notes before you go out to hit or play next time.

2.      Videotape yourself and study the tapes to see how you really are instead of how you think you are.

3.      Observe better players. Focus on specific aspects of their game that you would like to incorporate into your own.

4.      Read instructional magazines.

5.      Review instructional articles and videos on tennis websites.

6.      After each match, make notes on specific aspects of your game. (I give my clients an “emotional report card” they can use to evaluate their mental skills).

7.      Watch the Australian Open and other major tennis tournaments. Focus on details like movement, recovery after a shot, how the pros respond to a missed shot, etc. Listen to the analysis of the announcers and pay attention to what the players say AFTER the match.

Committing to on-going self-study whether it be your tennis game or others aspects of your life will usually pay big dividends in the long run. View improvement as life-long learning and enjoy the journey!

Upcoming Events

Next month, I will be heading to New Orleans to attend the annual meeting of the Anxiety Disorders Association of America.

For more information go to www.cognitivetherapy.cc or www.mentalskillstennis.com

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January 2011

DR.ROBERT HELLER’S MIND-BODY NEWSLETTER

Sports and Counseling Psychology

QUOTE OF THE MONTH

“Be bold. If you’re going to make an error, make a doozey, and don’t be afraid to hit the ball.” Billy Jean King

How many times have we tightened up or hit a ball tentatively for fear of making a mistake? Champions in any endeavor are willing to take calculated risks. Often times, the less we fear making mistakes, the less mistakes we make.

Yoga and Performance

The TREE pose is an excellent standing pose to help develop balance and lower leg strength. As you shift your weight to the right side, place your left foot against the inside of your right thigh, as close to the groin as possible. Your toes are facing downward. Your right leg is straight and strong. Hold the position for up to a minute. If you can, extend both arms straight up overhead. If you have trouble balancing yourself, do it initially against a wall. Repeat on the opposite side. (Consult a trained yoga teacher for greater safety and success in performing any pose).

Keeping those New Year’s Resolutions

Wishing and hoping rarely get the job done. In spite of our best intentions, most of our New Year’s resolutions tend to dissolve over the first few weeks of January. To have a greater chance of succeeding with our resolutions, here are some tips I work on with my private clients:

  1. Write down your resolutions.
  2. Have an objective way to measure your success.
  3. Set short, medium and long term strategies to accomplish larger goals.
  4. Set a time table for accomplishing each goal or parts of it.
  5. Review your plan daily.
  6. Consider rewarding yourself for staying the course and punishing yourself for falling off track.
  7. View set backs or lack of progress only as normal, temporary blocks and stay committed in your efforts to work through them.
  8. Use resources to help you when needed: other people, consultants, books, tapes, the internet etc.

The Whole is Greater than the Sum of its Parts

I recently participated in a charitable event that gave me great joy and satisfaction. A friend of mine, organized a “toy party” over Christmas for kids who were stuck in a hospital. He gathered a bunch of local teenagers, took them shopping at a toy store and we car pooled down to the hospital. We visited the playroom as well as some of the private rooms for the kids who were too ill to come out. It was both an uplifting and heart wrenching experience. In addition to the good feeling of helping other’s in need, it provided “emotional perspective”. Next time I am on the court and getting upset about a missed shot, poor call or losing a match, I can remind myself that compared to so many other things in life, this is just “small stuff” and one should NEVER sweat the small stuff!

New Article

My newest article, “The 7 Habits of Successful Teaching Pros” was just published in Racket Sports Industry magazine. I talk about Vision, Lifelong Learning, People Skills, Self-Care, Mentors, Economics and Gratitude. I think it can be applied to a great many professions and careers. It’s available on newsstands and by subscription. Or, e-mail me and I can send you the pre-publication version ( info@robertheller.net).

Upcoming Appearances

In mid January I will be returning to a Boca Raton company to present a talk on “Working more effectively as a Team” focusing on communication, assertiveness skills and dealing with difficult people and situations. Watch for upcoming articles on sports psychology coming out this year in “Tennis Life Magazine.”

Make it a great year!

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MENTAL SKILLS  NEWSLETTER

OCTOBER 2010

Welcome.

The U.S. Open provided lots of action and lessons we can learn from. One important lesson is NOT to be intimidated by the rankings. Many of the top ranked and seated players fell in the early rounds or didn’t get close to their expected finish, while a number of “lesser” players performed exceedingly well. By focusing on playing your best and not caring so much about whether you win or lose, you can sometimes turn the tide or the odds. Alternatively, you can cultivate a “Serena Williams” attitude of expecting to win every time she plays regardless of her opponent. If the belief in winning translates into the mental skills of tenacity, persistence and strategic decisions based on the opponent, score and circumstance, your chances of being successful will improve dramatically.

DEVELOPING THE TOTAL PLAYER

I am surprised how many times I see experienced tennis pros focus on teaching the technical part of the game without incorporating mental, emotional and athletic aspects of tennis. This is critical, especially in developing the game is adults who are not athletic or who have not participated in sports in their youth. For example, teaching anticipation skills, recognizing the direction, spin and speed of the ball, and training/practicing “springing” into the first step are areas that can and should be incorporated with every student at every age and level. Similarly, the mental and emotional skills of concentration, visual imagery, “attitude and behavior management” , deep breathing and related basic skills are often neglected or limited to just high performance players. You don’t need to be a sports psychologist to teach some of these skills or a high performance tennis player to benefit from them.

TENNIS BLOGS

I have dramatically increased the number of sports psychology tennis blogs on my website, www.mentalskillstennis.com. I invite you to read and comment on them! I will be also adding to the list of free sports psychology articles you can freely access on the site as well. If you have other topics you would like me to address in future blogs or newsletters, please let me know. You can e-mail me at info@robertheller.net

UPCOMING APPEARANCES

I will be presenting a “Mental Tennis Skills” clinic to approximately 60 women who play on teams and in leagues in Palm Beach County. The clinic is just for the members of a private club in Boynton Beach and will be held in November. Several other clinics are in the works. If you would like to have me present at your facility, have your tennis director or chair of the tennis committee contact me. The clinics are off court, fun, interesting and immediately useful. You don’t have to be a tennis professional to “think” like one.

TENNISMIND : SELF-HELP FOR MENTAL TOUGHNESS

The TENNISMIND CD Rom program is a mental conditioning program that can help any player improve their mental skills and performance under pressure. Based on self-hypnosis you are trained to get into a relaxed state and focus on key ideas and strategies to cope with 20 of the most common and difficult mental challenges tennis players experience. SPECIAL OFFER: This month, when you purchase a TENNISMIND program, you will receive a FREE copy of my book, “Manage Your Stress”. Order directly on the products page of my website, www.mentalskillstennis.com.

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Mind-Body Newsletter

Vol.13-December 2009

THANKSGIVING OFFER OPPORTUNITY FOR SELF-IMPROVEMENT

There are many important life messages we can learn by reflecting on this holiday. By giving thanks for what we have and not what we lack, we create a positive energy and focus to move forward in our lives. By caring for others more than we care for and about ourselves, we learn about the joy of acting in self-less ways.

The new movie, “The Blind Side” provides a dramatic example of this as it focuses on what happens when you give unconditional love and respect to another person. It brings to life the meaning of the statement, “The more you give, the more you get”.

Did you take time around the Thanksgiving dinner table to say or reflect what you are thankful for? If you haven’t, don’t wait for the next holiday; take out pen and paper and write out all the gifts and opportunities you have been afforded in your life, from the smallest to the largest. By making this a regular practice, you will find yourself becoming more patient and tolerant with yourself and others. You will learn to keep a healthier perspective and find it far easier not to sweat the small stuff.

THE POWER OF POSITIVE THINKING

The book title by the same name, was written by Norman Vincent Peale more than 50 years ago and its message has never been more relevant. In an era of negativity, self-criticism and perfectionism, the impact of what we think and feed our brain has far reaching effects for how we feel about ourselves and how we behave. In my own books, work with clients and personal life, I make extensive use of “affirmations”, positive ideas and expressions. Here is a sample of some of my favorites:

“Accentuate the positive, eliminate the negative.”

“Nobody can make you feel inferior without your consent.”

“Life is a terminal illness-enjoy today.”

“Every minute you are angry, you lose 60 seconds of happiness.”

“When the going gets tough, the tough get going.”

“You can’t afford the luxury of a negative thought.”

“Self-esteem is trying to do the best you can and being satisfied with the result.”

“I don’t know the key to success, but the key to failure is trying to please everybody.”

There are books on affirmations where you can choose a “thought” for the day to read and reflect on. Not a bad way to start your day!

THE SCIENCE OF EXERCISE AND MOOD

A recent article in U.S. News and World Report found that aerobic activities such as running, biking and walking for 30 minutes a day had positive psychological and physical effects on mood. In addition, the use of an “exercise log” helps people to maintain their exercise routines. While “strength training” may provide similar benefits to mood, there is not yet enough evidence to support this recommendation.

Another report out of Princeton University on “Why Exercise Makes you Less Anxious” suggests that it may take between 3-6 weeks for you to notice a change in anxiety levels following an exercise routine.

My take: stretching, strengthening and moderate aerobic type exercise should be combined in a daily routine or sport and/ or exercise.

QUOTE OF THE MONTH

“When one gets beaten by somebody better, one has to know how to lose with humility.”

Rafael Nadal – Top Professional Tennis Player

BETTER IN THE BAHAMAS

My 3-day trip to provide mental skills training to elite junior tennis players in the Bahamas shows the growing international interest in providing youth with tools they can use in sports and in life to be better competitors and cope with pressure both on and off the tennis courts. Special thanks to owner/director Bradley Bain for sponsoring the program.

GIVE THE GIFT OF KNOWLEDGE

The newest edition to the pocket-sized self-help series I have authored for Luxart Communications is on the topic of “Depression” and should be out by the end of the year. The guides are practical, up-to-date and combine my many years of working with clients with the best strategies reported in the field. They are available on the products section of my website, www.robertheller.net.

See you next month!

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Mind-Body Newsletter

Vol.12-November 2009

Wisdom comes from varied people and places. I enjoyed reading a small piece written by Wally Amos, the founder of Wally’s Muffin Company. The title is “Be positive regardless”. Here is a brief part of it: “ We have been conditioned to believe that adversity is negative. Overcoming adverse situations is how we gain strength and character. It focuses us to get on top of the circumstances and not lie down under them. Adversity reminds us that we are stronger than we could ever imagine.”

Every day, the financial publication, Investor’s Business Daily prints “10” Secrets to Success and highlights one for readers to focus on that day. I think they are all worthy behaviors and attitudes to strive towards.

  1. HOW YOU THINK IS EVERYTHING. Always be positive. Think success, not failure. Beware of a negative environment.
  2. DECIDE UPON YOUR TRUE DREAMS AND GOALS. Write down your specific goals and develop a plan to reach them.
  3. TAKE ACTION. Goals are nothing without action. Don’t be afraid to get started. Just do it.
  4. NEVER STOP LEARNING. Go back to school or read books. Get training and acquire new skills.
  5. BE PERSISTENT AND WORK HARD. Success is a marathon, not a sprint. Never give up.
  6. LEARN TO ANALYZE DETAILS. Get all the facts, all the input. Learn from your mistakes.
  7. FOCUS YOUR TIME AND MONEY. Don’t let other people or things distract you.
  8. DON’T BE AFRAID TO INNOVATE: BE DIFFERENT. Following the herd is a sure way to mediocrity.
  9. DEAL AND COMMUNICATE WITH PEOPLE EFFECTIVELY: No person is an island. Learn to understand and motivate others.
  10. BE HONEST AND DEPENDABLE:TAKE RESPONSIBILITY:Otherwise, numbers 1-9 won’t matter.

NEW ARTICLE

My article, “Are your players good sports?” was just published in “Racquet Sports Industry” and features a sportsmanship quiz I developed for coaches and parents to use with players in helping to foster good character.  I remember an important phrase I came upon some time ago: “Sports doesn’t teach character, it reflects it”. Let’s hope more parents and coaches take the lead in emphasizing “sportsmanship” as much as they do “winning”.

UPCOMING WORKSHOP

I am delighted to have been invited to put on a 3 day Mental Toughness Training Course, November 6-8 for the elite junior athletes and their parents at the National Training Center in Nassau, Bahamas.

RETHINKING ANTI-DEPRESSANT MEDICATIONS

The October 09 edition of Consumer Reports On Health reported a study that found 90% of people who took anti-depressant medication experienced at least one side effect including sexual problems, weight gain and in rare cases, suicidal thinking. Up to 30% found the side effects to be so bad that they stopped taking the drug.

LIFESTYLE CHANGES CAN SAVE YOUR LIFE

According to an article by Dr. Edward Rosick for Life Extension, high blood pressure or hypertension, affects over 50 million people in the United States and contributes to the death of almost 250,000 people a year. The DASH diet, which restricts salt intake, along with losing weight and quitting smoking can make a big difference in improving your health and well being.

To encourage you and your friends to make a positive lifestyle change, I am offering 1 free pocket-sized self-help guide for every 2 you purchase. You can choose from books on Stress, Weight, Smoking and Alcohol. Go to www.robertheller.net and click on the products page. Order 2, and e-mail the 3rd title you would like to receive for free to info@robertheller.net.

GETTING RID OF BACK PAIN

The November issue of “Natural Solutions” magazine featured an article of “How Integrative Therapies Can Heal Back Pain”. It looked at a case study of a woman suffering with debilitating back pain and her experiences with different types of care and modalities including: herbs, psychotherapy, chiropractic, physical therapy, Rolfing, acupuncture, massage therapy and yoga.

Cutting to the chase, she gets better. In fact, approximately 80% of people with back pain get better with or without treatment. However, the 20% who don’t need to play around with the mix of traditional and non-traditional approaches to see what combinations work best for them.

Remember, worry and stress in one’s life can be reflected in muscular tension and tightness. As the tension is held for longer periods of time, the muscles eventually go into spasm and then pain. Learning to balance your life and reduce its many pressures can help in eliminating some of the most common causes of back pain.

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Mind-Body Newsletter

Vol. 10, September 2009

TEXTING TROUBLES

A series of reports suggests that texting and the use of cell phones while driving increases the risk of accidents to that of someone who is legally drunk behind the wheel. As a driver, you need to eliminate this practice. As a passenger, you need to be vigilant of those who are driving and protect your own safety by insisting they not make or receive calls or texts while driving.

SMART RECOVERY

Self Management and Recovery Training is a national FREE non-profit alcohol and substance abuse program with groups around the country and on-line. It is an alternative to AA and based on cognitive-behavioral therapy principles of recovery and relapse prevention. For more information check out www.SMARTRECOVERY.org.

ON-LINE THERAPY AND DEPRESSION

According to a study in Australia reported Consumer Reports Health (Sept. ‘09), an 8-week program of on-line counseling consisting of e-mails, group chat and homework assignments was just as effective as traditional face-to-face treatment.

THE ‘LINGERING’ POSITIVE FEELINGS OF EXERCISE

According to a researcher at the University of Vermont, in a comparison between two groups, one that rested for 20 minutes and one that performed aerobic exercise for 20 minutes, the exercise group reported better moods for up to 12 hours post exercise.

BI-POLAR VS. DEPRESSION

In a recent study, 40% of patients coming in for an evaluation were not correctly diagnosed for bi-polar syndrome. While they reported symptoms of depression they failed to recognize and report symptoms such as persistent irritability, and elevated mood just before or after periods of depression. As a result, medication treatment was only given for depression. One suggestion is to bring a close friend or relative in as part of an evaluation to get a more accurate diagnosis and better treatment.

ASSESSING A SLEEP PROBLEM

Do you have trouble falling or staying asleep? Do you have episodes of disturbed sleep? Are you tired or sleepy during the day?

If you answered yes to any of these questions you may have a sleep problem or disorder that can not only affect your performance at school or work but your health and safety (driving, accidents, etc.)  Don’t medicate yourself with alcohol or over the counter medications or look for a quick fix by the commercials hawking prescription meds (remember Michael Jackson!). Get a competent evaluation by your medical doctor, mental health professional or sleep specialist to learn what your treatment needs and what the best options are.

CAN I BE HYPNOTIZED?

According to hypnosis expert, Dr. David Spiegal, about two-thirds of adults are at least somewhat hypnotizable. Good signs are: having a good imagination, getting easily absorbed in a movie or novel and having a sense of trust. I often use hypnosis with clients with a wide range of issues including pain management, performance enhancement, irritable bowel and smoking!

SEPTEMBER APPEARANCES

I will be at the Florida Tennis Smash on Friday, Sept. 4 at the Marriott Hotel  in Boca Raton, FL from 3:30-5:00pm providing information and brief consultations to junior players, their coaches and parents.

On September 22, I will be presenting a specialty workshop in Marco Island, FL on “Bringing Sports Psychology Skills to the Courts” for coaches attending the World Conference of the United States Professional Tennis Teaches Association.

Please share this newsletter with friends and send your comments, questions and suggestions to me at info@robertheller.net.

Until next month…

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Mind-Body Newsletter

Vol. 9, August 2009

FAT BURNING ADVICE

According to fitness expert and sports nutritionist, Donna Mertl, for healthy individuals, the best way to burn fat is to exercise the first thing in the morning BEFORE eating. You should perform some form of cardio exercise for 20-45 minutes 3-4 times a week at 75% of your maximum heartrate.

THE POWER OF THE MIND

On a recent segment of the SPORTS SCIENCE show, the power of the mind was clearly demonstrated on camera. A professional boxer’s  “punching power” was measured while hitting a training dummy. He was told to hit the dummy as hard as he can to establish a baseline. He then spent 30 seconds getting himself as “psyched” as he could by thinking of something very upsetting  (with his trainer adding verbal motivation). He then punched the dummy again and increased the power of his punch by a whopping 60%! In the last experiment he was injected by a doctor with a shot of epinephrine equivalent to the amount that might be given to someone whose heart had stopped. His punching power following the injection was greater than the baseline punch but LESS than the punching power under the “mental” stimulation condition. Bottom line: training your mind can get you “whopping” results!

SLEEPLESSNESS

ABC news reported a study by the National Sleep Foundation that estimated a third of all Americans are losing sleep due to worries about finances, the economy and jobs. Rather than pop pills, a power nap during the day may allow you to recoup some of your lost sleep and reduce some of the ill effects of sleep deprivation. Better still, learning and using simple relaxation methods and sleep “hygiene” that provide natural methods to reduce worry and allow you to get your ZZZ’s. You can find additional useful methods in “Manage Your Stress” is available on the products page of www.robertheller.net.

MENTAL SKILLS ACROSS AGE AND ABILITY LEVELS

That’s the title of my newest article, a version of which was just published in “Tennis Life” magazine. Visit my website and check out that and a number of other free articles.

“L” IS FOR “LONGEVITY”

LIFESTYLE: Out with junk food, tobacco and excessive alcohol, in with small amounts of healthy food and quality sleep, exercise, relaxation, etc. You get the picture.

LAUGHTER: A little goes a long way. Smiling and laughing makes us feel good and is good for the immune system.

LOVE: The Beatles had it mostly right, “All You Need Is Love”. Loving yourself and others provides meaning and satisfaction in life. As a friend of mine once said, “Relationships are the currency of life.”

Your comments and questions and contributions to the newsletter are welcome.

Until next month…

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MIND-BODY NEWSLETTER
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DR.ROBERT HELLER’S MIND-BODY NEWSLETTER

“Helping You to Feel and Perform at your Best”

March 2012

Quote of the Month

“Action is the antidote to despair”- Joan Baez. I didn’t know singer Joan Baez was also a behavioral psychologist. Often times in working with clients they are very good about doing assignments between sessions if it involves reading or writing assignments but fall short when they have to deliver on making a change in their behavior. In cognitive-behavioral therapy, we believe that by changing your thoughts AND behaviors, you are able to change your feelings. Today, think about what ACTION you can take to improve something in your life.

COUNSELING BY COMPUTER

I have been counseling people by phone for years and using video conferencing with SKYPE over the past several years. It’s convenient and has allowed me to help individuals who don’t live near my office in Boca Raton, Fl. In fact, I am currently working with someone from Spain. Now, according to Dr.Lynn Bufka of the American Psychological Association, long distance counseling via Skype is earning respectability and studies are underway in psychology and medicine to determine just how helpful this approach can be.

RITALIN GONE WRONG

This story in the Sunday New York Times tracks the history and highlights some recent study on the drugging of children who are alleged to have Attention Deficit Disorder. Rather than putting kids on drugs that do nothing to change the conditions that derail their development in the first place, the author sites studies that conclude “There has been clear evidence that the developing brain is shaped by experience”. As a former school psychologist for 8 years, I can tell you that teaching kids how to relax and concentrate and parents and teachers how to manage kids’ behaviors often work as well or better than drugs, have no negative side effects and tend to last.

TECHNIQUES FOR OVERCOMING PROCRASTINATION

One of my favorite techniques is the 5 minute plan. We can do almost anything for 5 minutes. Make a deal with yourself to work on anything you have been procrastinating about for 5 minutes. After that time you can stop if you like and you are “successful”.  If you “choose’ to continue longer you may. Often times, folks find by overcoming the initial inertia they can keep things rolling more easily.

NEW ARTICLES ON SPORTS ISSUES

If you are Director of a sports facility or a sports coach, you may want to check out my new article which focuses on what business practices you can use to retain customers, members and students in tough economic times. It appears in the March issue of Racket Sports Industry and will soon be available on my website, www.cognitivetherapy.cc .

My most recent article on “Developing Confidence” will soon be coming out in FIT TENNIS newsletter.

UPCOMING EVENTS

In June , I will be presenting a workshop on Sports Psychology for the Florida Psychological Association. The next newsletter will feature an article on the CBS” 60 Minutes” segment that just aired on Depression and the Placebo Effect. The story generated an enormous amount of interest and controversy.

Until next time-

Dr.Robert Heller

www.cognitivetherapy.cc

info@robertheller.net

561 451-2731

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DR. ROBERT HELLER’S MIND-BODY NEWSLETTER

“Strategies for a healthy body and mind”

January 2012

QUOTE OF THE MONTH

“A mind troubled by doubt cannot focus on the course to victory” – Arthur Golden

Be aware of your doubt. Take time to reflect on the pros and cons of your decision. Once you have decided, stay the course and work in a committed way. Don’t look back just straight ahead. Don’t fear mistakes or bad decisions. No regrets! As the great tennis player, Billy Jean King said, “Be bold. If you’re going to make an error, make a doozey and don’t be afraid to hit the ball.”

 

BOOK OF THE MONTH

 

“Light on Life” by B.K.S. Iyengar, the 93 year old founder of the Iyengar style of yoga.

Mr. Iyengar interprets the philosophy of yoga (along with his personal philosophy) in a highly practical way which has many principles and practices very similar to the Western, modern day, cognitive-behavioral therapy. For example, in discussing the topic of dealing with adversity he says, “By facing up to adversity and suffering, and accepting it as a necessary means, our anxieties are resolved and disappear.” Acceptance Therapy, a modern variation of cognitive therapy espouses a very similar idea.

 

DON’T MAKE PROMISES YOU CAN’T KEEP

 

With 2012 having arrived, no doubt many of us have made “New Year’s Resolutions” with a goal towards improving ourselves. Yet, most people fail miserably at keeping their resolutions. Among the main reasons are:

  1. Having too many goals.
  2. Having goals that are too ambitious.
  3. Having goals that lack clarity and specificity.
  4. Having goals that lack a specific time frame for accomplishing.
  5. Having goals that don’t include the methods you will use to accomplish them.
  6. Failing to write and/or post goals in a visible place.
  7. Failing you review your goals regularly and your progress towards them.

An example of a good goal would be :

“I will lose 10 pounds over the next 2 months by eating more salads and vegetables, less bread and sweat deserts and increase my intake of water from 2-6 glasses of water per day. I will increase my exercise from 2 times of week of playing doubles (tennis) to 4 times a week, at least 2 of will be playing ‘singles’.”

 

FEAR OF ANTI-DEPRESSANT MEDS

 

According to a study reported in hypnosis master, Dr. Michael Yapko’s newsletter, the most frequent reason for a patients not disclosing depressive symptoms to their primary care physicians was the concern that they would be prescribed anti-depressants. Many people are afraid of the side effects of these medications. If physicians (and the general public) were more aware of the benefits of using cognitive-behavioral therapies for treating depression, many more individuals would seek help and likely learn to be LESS depressed less often. While anti-depressant medications may be necessary at times or even long term for certain individuals, many others can battle depression quite effectively with CBT, Hypnosis and related non-pharmacological methods.

This month my pocket sized  guidebook, “DEPRESSION” is on sale! Order 1 copy through the products section of my website, www.cognitivetherapy.cc and get the second one free!

Happy New Year!

Dr. Bob

If you know someone else who’d be interested in receiving these mailings on mind-body skills and peak performance trainings, please encourage them to sign up through my websites, www.mentalskillstennis.com , www.cognitivetherapy.cc or send an e-mail to info@robertheller.net with the subject heading, “ATTN: add to e-mail list”. Thank you.

Be sure to check out the new blogs and articles on each of the websites as they are updated farily regularly.

If you have ideas for future articles or questions about your own performance, send them to me at info@robertheller.net.

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DR.ROBERT HELLER’S MIND BODY NEWSLETTER
“Performing Your Best in Sport and in Life”
December, 2011

Quote of the Month

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